Category Archives: Uncategorized

The Good Life

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“Great to Good” – Lanny Hubbard, Aug 31, 2018

Professor Lanny Hubbard shared a message on what it means to Live a Good Life. Below is the accompanying notes to the full message which you can listen to on our podcast here. Enjoy!

Isaiah 1:17 says that God’s people are to learn to do good. This means that their understanding of what “good” is a process. It is not immediately intuitive. People increase in their understanding of good throughout their lives. How does this take place? It occurs by learning to see how the attribute of “good” can be worked into many areas of their life. From the Hebrew and Greek languages, we learn that the interpretation of “good” is very broad. It applies to many aspects of life and in each area the individual must learn how to apply it. The following is a list of various ways that “goodness” is applied to these areas of life. Read More

Congratulations Karyn Wells

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Karyn Wells graduated with her Bth in 2018. She graciously shares her journey in this article.

Young and in love with our hearts set on ministry, Jeff and I married the summer between our junior and senior year at PBC in 1987. I worked full-time that fall so he could finish his senior year and graduate. Read More

Dr Larry Asplund

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IMG_7970The 50th Anniversary Celebration provided so many moments to reconnect people who students encountered during their time at PBC.  With out a doubt the instructors played a major role in the PBC experience.  One of those beloved professors was Dr Larry Asplund.  It was such a treat to have him here for the weekend.  He and his wife Lynda faithfully served for eighteen years at Portland Bible College. Dr Ashland was gifted at making the Bible alive and fun. His humor opened the door to deep and thought provoking questions. Lynda served as the administrator of Christian Leadership Training Institute, the precursor to our online and affiliate programs. What a gift they both were during their time at PBC.

Currently Dr. Asplund serves as a part-time Instructor in the School of Divinity at Regent University. He is the son and the father of a pastor and comes from a long line of Christian ministers and educators. Before coming to Regent University, he had been involved in pastoral ministry and teaching for 45 years, serving as an Executive Pastor, Teaching Pastor, Senior Pastor, and church planter. For 25 of those years he was actively engaged in higher education, serving as a full-time on-campus Bible college teacher, seminary professor, and University Vice President. He and Lynda have been married for 46 years, and they have two adult children, ages 39 and 44. He has a B.A. in Philosophy & Biblical Studies, M.A. in Biblical Literature, D.Min. in Leadership and Spiritual Formation, and an Ed.D. (ABD) in Educational Leadership. He has also served as a “ghost writer” for well-known authors, publishing his own book, “Transformers: Local Congregations as Agents of Community Transformation. Dr. Asplund teaches in the area of Practical Theology for the School of Divinity.

 

International Development Class tours REAL LIFE Exhibit

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IMG_7967Some things are unimaginable until you experience them in Real Life.

Students from the International Development course visited the REAL LIFE Exhibit hosted by Medical Teams International (http://www.medicalteams.org). The exhibit, which is hosted in a large warehouse, gave the class an opportunity to see and learn about the lives of people affected by disaster, conflict, and poverty around the world—and then they learn how to take action and make a difference.

The eight places they visited around the world were:

  1. A portrayal of the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan (“Yolanda”) in the Philippines
  2. A room with a 25 foot tsunami wave
  3. A Ugandan camp for refugees from neighboring countries
  4. A Haitian earthquake site and a tent camp where homeless Haitians are living;
  5. A Cambodian village where mothers and children struggle to survive and thrive
  6. A Mexican garbage dump
  7. A Guatemalan community where children die from preventable illnesses
  8. A Mobile Dental unit where children and adults in our local communities receive care

Each student journaled their thoughts and feelings as they walked through the large exhibit. Walls displayed drawings made by children in the disaster zones as well as their stories. The PBC students wrote messages, prayers and thoughts to these children. One student shared:

The part of the exhibit that affected me the most was the video of the woman whose husband had died forcing her and her children to seek refuge in another place.  She said that none of her children, or she herself had been sick until they moved, but then they all became sick and the situation became so hopeless.  She said that if it wasn’t for the help of MTI’s care they would have all died.  This story just really hit me because it put a face to the suffering.  I felt for them and I was happy to see that they were able to get better with the help of a non-profit. (Nikki)

I talked to Sures Kumar, a 14 year old boy who saw his family be swept away in the tsunami. “I tried to reach my sister”. Those words tore me up inside. Family is everything and that really just hits your heart that this young boy tried to save his little sister. I would first give him a hug. Having experienced the tragic death of a family member, I know that there isn’t much you can actually say that helps at the beginning. But, ultimately, I would share that God has a future and hope for him. (Brady)

PBC Students also noted the information that startled or jumped out to the students as they walked through the exhibit. The main stats they noted were:

  1. Every 5 seconds a child under the age of 5 dies of a preventable disease.
  2. Eighty percent of disease in the world is carried through unclean water.
  3. Half of the world lives on less than $2 a day.
  4. Before the Syrian crisis there was over 300 physicians in major city in Syria and after there was only 30 registered physicians in the city.
  5. More than 40% of people in the world don’t have access to latrines

PBC Students also journaled on themes of justice, hope, compassion and courage.  One student wrote about compassion:

“A deep sympathy and sorrow for another who is stricken by misfortune, accompanied by a strong desire to alleviate the suffering” (Dictionary.com). Compassion means to care, to feel, to break for His people. There is no other way to genuinely help without first understanding and obtaining compassion. This is only half of the definition – true compassion is to do something. Compassion is to be in their shoes and step into their world and really share in their sorrow. We must first ask for the heart of the Lord, that we may have His heart and allow ours to break for what breaks His. To obtain a complete compassion for His people, we are to be moved deeply to actually live out His commands to care for His people with action. (Lauren)

At the end of the Exhibit, students went shopping in the Marketplace to pick up action cards to:

  1. commit to pray for refugees and people impacted by natural disasters,
  2. to sign-up to volunteer to pack medical supplies to places Medical Teams serves, or
  3. to commit financially to the places impacted by armed conflict or unhealthy living conditions.

Visit their website (http://www.medicalteams.org/home/real-life-exhibit) to get more details on how you can go experience these places around the world for yourself.

Medical Teams International is an international, non-profit organization based in Tigard, Oregon. They respond to disasters around the world—and here at home—by sending teams of volunteer medical professionals and medical supplies to care for the sick and injured. They also mobilize long-term health promotion initiatives, collaborating with established partners within each community to ensure that our programs have a sustainable impact.

Is The Bible Worth Studying?

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When it comes to studying the Bible, the first questions to ask are, “Is the Bible worth studying?” and “Is this the right Bible?” These questions form the heart of Bibliology — the study of the Bible. The information on which one bases life is an important decision that should be approached with scrutiny. If a person were to base his or her diet off of what was seen on TV during the Super Bowl, that person’s physical health would rapidly decline. In this same way, if someone were to form his or her life’s principles off a few catchy phrases, that person’s mental, physical and spiritual health could all crumble.

Click on this link to download a full chapter on this subject.

S.T.O.R.M. Japan 2016

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It was an honor to lead a team of PBC students and alumni on a ministry trip to Life Church in Osaka, Japan led by Pastors Joel (BTh ’97) and Kellie (BCM ’97) Kaylor.

This STORM was one of the most stretching, challenging and fruitful experiences in my life. It was such a privilege to serve churches in my home country. Although our daily itinerary was packed and there were many last minute changes, each member of our team did an amazing job to accomplish their ministry tasks without complaint.

We were involved in many things, but our first highlight was a night of worship (concert) and workshops. There were about 60-70 people who signed up for various workshops such as a songwriting, leadership, worship leader, vocal and musician clinics. Approximately 110 people showed up to the concert and we had a great time worshiping God together.

Church leader and alumna, Yukie (Nishihara) Kaylor reported that 70% of participants were from outside of life church. People were really hungry to receive from God. We received wonderful feedback from many participants and this event served as a bridge connecting several local churches in the area.

We led two weekend services. Life church is a worshiping church and the atmosphere was very similar to home at City Bible Church making it very easy to lead the congregation in worship. Each team-member did an amazing job to serve the church and the leadership team. Pastors Carlos Marin and Jeremy Scott led a powerful prophetic ministry session that first Sunday afternoon. During this time we prayed for pastor Joel and his family, as well as the entire leadership team and others in the congregation. The Holy Spirit moved mightily and many people were baptized in the Holy Spirit for the first time.

Another personal highlight of this trip was going down to Kumamoto in order to do volunteer work for earthquake relief. It was definitely heartbreaking for us to see the city in such brokenness. What we could do was a very small thing, yet we saw people who won back their smile because of our volunteer work. I was personally overwhelmed and blessed as we blessed them. There were also several personal divine encounters for me in Kumamoto such as meeting with my cousin who I hadn’t seen for decades, Eiichi (a leader of Ariake Bible Church and a staff of Operation Blessings), and Joshua (associate pastor of Ariake Bible Church).

Our three days in Kumamoto were unforgettable.

Our second Saturday in Life Church was another pretty packed day for us because we ended up leading worship practice to the life church worship team in the morning, hung out with their youth group in the afternoon and had a worship night/service in the evening.

Every event in the day was really fun and meaningful for all of us. It was fun for us to celebrate the life church’s 7 th year anniversary with them
at the second Sunday afternoon. We could meet many people and prayed for them as well. It was very meaningful for us to invite all of the leadership team members to the dinner afterward so that we could show our appreciation for them. Each leader expressed their gratitude toward us with sharing words with us. It was a wonderful way to end our STORM trip. God has great things in store for the nation of Japan and we are blessed that PBC has had such an impact in the lives of many church leaders in that country.

In Him,

Yasuhito Hontani, BCM